Blackmarket - Hamburg, October 2016

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ABLEISM / ADAPTATION / ANARCHY / ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE / AUTONOMY / BODYSWAP / COMMUNITY / CRIPPLES / CRITICAL DISABILITY STUDIES / CYBORG / DEFICIENCY / DESIGN / DESIRE / EDUCATION / EMBODIMENT / ETHICS / FILM / FREAKS / FUTURE / HALLUCINATION / HEROES AND HEROINES / HISTORY / HUMAN / HUMANISM / HUMAN RIGHTS / INABILITY / INCLUSION / INSANITY / LANGUAGE / MIGRATION / NORMALITY / OPTIMIZATION / PROSTHETICS / REPAIR / SENSIBILITY / SEX / SHAKESPEARE / SHAMANISM / SPECTACLE / SYNESTHESIA / VISUAL REGIME / WORK /

PRACTICAL EXERCISE / EKPHRASIS


___ABLEISM

Dis*Ability, ableism, and the fiction of autonomy. Why we are struggling so hard with our dependencies and fragilities and how this can sometimes end up in discriminatory practices. (DE/EN)

Rebecca Maskos is a psychologist, freelance journalist, and research assistant in the field of Social Work and Disability at the Hochschule Bremen - University of Applied Sciences. She is currently working on her doctoral thesis investigating the individual and societal meanings of the wheelchair. Other topics she explores are the concept of ableism, gender and disability, media imagery of disability, and critical bioethics.


The gratitude predicament – Why sometimes it is important to be ungrateful. (DE)

As one of the founders of the German ›cripple movement‹, Udo Sierck has been asking, for over thirty years, why many people think of disabled people as kind, grateful, and a little stupid. As a lecturer and publicist, he is convinced that nothing is as boring as normality and perfection, and that a few more children, women, and men with disabilities can only do us good.


___ADAPTATION

Adaptation and variation: The history of my shoes and the evolution of Darwin’s theory. (EN)

Kenny Fries have been writing, for two decades, about how physical disability provides an understanding of the interconnectedness among individuals and also among different cultures. He has used the prism of his life as a writer, one who lives with a congenital disability, to forge a new understanding of a wide range of values and ideas, from systems of interdependence to Darwinian evolution. He is currently investigating the experiences of disability in Germany.


What’s so great about walking? Why nobody wants to be »wheelchair bound«. The ideal of standing-up and the perspective of sitting. (DE/EN)

Rebecca Maskos is a psychologist, freelance journalist, and research assistant in the field of Social Work and Disability at the Hochschule Bremen - University of Applied Sciences. She is currently working on her doctoral thesis investigating the individual and societal meanings of the wheelchair. Other topics she explores are the concept of ableism, gender and disability, media imagery of disability, and critical bioethics.


___ANARCHY


Insights into the work of recuperation support. How to put up with confusion, despair, and disturbance. (DE/FR)

Gwen Schulz is a carpenter, educator, and recovery counselor. She herself was diagnosed with psychosis and spent several years in a psychiatric ward. She knows the insecurity, the stigma, and the disconcertment triggered by the diagnosis of psychosis. She currently works at the University Hospital, Eppendorf, where she accompanies people during acute crises, helps them overcome their private chaos, and assume control of their lives.


___ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Intelligent furniture. (DE/EN)

Serge Autexier is head of the Bremen Ambient Assisted Living Lab (BAAL), an intelligent, interacting, 60m² apartment at the German Research Centre for Artificial Intelligence. Either for people with or without disabilities, future housing will change our everyday life: be it a talking wardrobe, which tells its blind housemate the color of chosen trousers; an accommodating fridge, which decides to order fresh milk; or an electric wheelchair that chauffeurs you to a shop and back to your home.


Sound sources and brain waves. About a hearing aid that can think. (DE)

Lorenz Fiedler is an electrical engineer. He is completing his doctorate at the University of Lübeck. In his research project he examines how the human brain handles acoustic signals. He aims to invent a hearing aid that will work well at a cocktail party. As the device is able to use brain waves to distinguish relevant from non-relevant sound sources, it could automatically amplify or repress sounds accordingly.


___AUTONOMY

Intersect me! Why is it so hard to think about different kinds of power relations? (DE/EN)

Doris Gerbig is a networker and knowledge disseminator from Hamburg. She studied sociology and specializes in critical sciences. She is also a teacher that works in the various fields of assistance. In her opinion, subjectivity and the ability to act are not naturally given human qualities, but instead always emerge from concrete power relations. If this is the case, how can we still find forms of subjective and political resistance and agency?


Autonomy as fiction. (DE)

Karl-Josef Pazzini studied philosophy, theology, pedagogy, mathematics, and art education. He is also a practicing psychoanalyst since 1982. Until 2014, he was a professor of fine arts and education at the University of Hamburg. He is currently writing a book on pornography as self-optimization. For him, autonomy is a fiction that massively devours one’s energy and causes suffering. Infatuation, love, hate, defense, resistance – everybody is constantly wired; so how is it even possible to be independent? How is it possible to be ›yourself‹, distinct, isolated, self-sufficient?


I’m the body, you’re the head. (DE)

Ewgenia Roth works as a personal assistant. Well, she doesn’t actually assist, but accompanies a woman with muscular dystrophy. Why she would call it ›accompanying‹ instead of assisting, she will gladly explain, along with what her work day looks and feels like, and why it has had a profound meaning for her.


___BODYSWAP


A body is only as real as its new look – body-swapping techniques in art, science, and therapeutics. (DE/EN)

Dawid Kasprowicz wrote about underfunded cultural scenes before completing a doctoral thesis on bodies immersing into virtual environments. He has grappled with the multidimensional history of immersion, and the playful arrays of ego, self, body, and the ›other‹ by employing ›body swapping‹, a technique researched by neurophysiologists, rehabilitation therapists, media artists, and philosophers. He is a researcher and lecturer at Leuphana University, Lüneburg.


Ordinary Girl. A tabletop musical theater with paper dolls. (DE)

Since 2003, Dennis Seidel works as a performer, musician, and storyteller at the theater Ladies and Gentlemen (Meine Damen und Herren), and for the artist network ›barner 16‹. He feels himself at home in every gender. His performances about the life of Jolina are an artistic synthesis of Seidel’s own way of living. Jolina is a fashion designer and lives in Miami. Her sisters and friends are paper dolls (objects as love and sex partners accompany Seidel for many years now). Seidel lets the audience in on this work-in-progress of Jolina’s melodramatic destiny.


___COMMUNITY


I am the concept! How participation can become collaboration. (DE)

Lis Marie Diehl is a member of a theatre collective concerned with possibilities for equal ways of working. In their new production, the collective, consisting of people with and without disabilities, question how is it possible to collaboratively develop a concept, particularly if it is a concept based on a joint research about euthanasia during the times of National Socialism.

Fortunately, there is another way. The path out of the institution into a new society. (DE)

Klaus Pramann is a psychiatrist. He was fired from the Schleswig state hospital in 1981 due to socio-psychiatric activities. He then went to Bremen, where his commitment to a new form of psychiatric practices led to the closure of the psychiatric ward Kloster Blankenburg. Subsequently, Pramann organized numerous ›Blue Caravans‹ and other campaigns against old and modernized psychiatry. Currently, he is planning a space of co-living and co-working for people with and without impairments.


The upcoming community: media identities and milieus. (DE)

Thomas Weber is professor at the Institute for Media and Communication at the University of Hamburg. He is concerned with media phantasms. His research revolves around depictions of memories and the past, as well as visions of future media imagined by popular media – in movies such as Matrix or Strange Days. His analysis focusses on defects, disruptions, and absences that emphasize the construction of these phantasms.


___CRIPPLES


›Cripple welfare‹. Physically challenged people in exhibitions and movies, 1911 to 1939. (DE)

Philipp Osten is a science historian. He teaches history and ethics of medical science at the UKE and develops exhibition for the Medical-Historic Museum in Hamburg. He tells about the public image of physically challenged people during the late German Empire and the Weimar Republic, when exhibitions on hygiene drew large crowds, and didactic cultural films were part of the everyday movie theatre program. In his talk, he will describe how an increasingly standardized visual culture led to evaluate people with disabilities by their productivity and capacity.


___CRITICAL DISABILITY STUDIES


Trans*materiality in queer and disability studies: A future ethics of intermediate states (DE)

Joke Janssen lives and works in Hamburg on the intersections of trans*/queer art|politics|theory, where s/he regularly fails with great enjoyment, and preferably in small collectives. Joke’s works circle the body under normative conditions: Which bodies are touchable, which are not right, and which are avoidable? How can we perceive possibilities for future bodies? Joke studied German sign language, sociology, gender and queer studies, and pursues a Ph.D. on trans*materialization beyond the visible at the University of Fine Arts, Hamburg.


Listen to Lounge Queer_DisAbility Politics – a radio documentary! (DE)

Nic Meyer studied dis_ability, gender and queer studies at the University of Hamburg. Besides theoretical debates, she is also concerned with an active involvement in queer-feminist dis_ability contexts. She will present an excerpt from her radio documentary, in which activists tell about their personal experiences, gender_disobedient and critical ableist interventions. Trigger warning: The audio piece contents explicit sexualized violence.


Unlimited and relational: What Donna Haraway’s cyborg can tell us about critical disability. (DE)

Marianne Pieper is a professor of sociology and head of the Center for Women, Gender and Queer Studies at the University of Hamburg. In her research, she studies the different ways of how inclusions and exclusions organize society. For example, when ableist and racist structures are presented as questions of individual ability, personal motivation, or a lack of willingness to integrate oneself into society or the job market – and thereby hold those responsible who suffer the most from those structures.


___CYBORG


Invading the body: Implantology, Enhancement, Cyborgianism (DE)

Laura Hille is a social scientist who is interested in the intersection of social theory, media culture, and the philosophy of technology. A reformulation of what we call ›life‹ is underway ever since cybernetics got under our skin with microchip implants invading our bodies, particularly with contemporary practices like biohacking – experiments of organic material and biometrical sensors – contest our concept of life itself.


»I’m a cyborg, but that’s OK«. New features for the human body via smart implants (with the possibility of live upgrading!). (DE)

Patrick Kramer is a cyborg from Hamburg. Being the manager of Digiwell – Smart up your life!, he distributes implants, neuro-trackers and biohacking-equipment. As a body hacker, he is not only equipped with a chip, but also experiments with the latest implants in his own body. Come as a human, leave as a cyborg! Let Dr. Kramer consult you on which implant suits you best, and have it surgically implemented on-site at a special rate.


___DEFICIENCY


If you can’t fix it, feature it! The dance follows the bodies, and bodies don’t follow the dance. (DE)

In addition to her internationally exhibited solo dance performances, the Hamburg based choreographer and winner of the 2016 George Tabori Prize Antje Pfundtner takes part in numerous group and cooperative projects. Starting from her own biography, she is interested in overcoming long established images of the ideal dancer’s body. Her choreographies stage specific movement qualities of individual bodies with and without disabilities.


Degrading traces of a diligent, middle-aged white male: How psychiatry originated from being a deficient science in 1900. (DE)

Kai Sammet is a historian of psychiatry at the Institute for Medical History and Ethics, University Hospital, Eppendorf. His research focuses on institutionalized knowledge of ›madness‹ and how it changes over time. As a physician and historian, he is particularly interested how today’s psychiatric practices can learn from its own historical progressions and regressions.


___DESIGN


DESIGN SPECULATION

Different by Design. A critical approach to augmented citizens and biodesign. (DE/EN/FR)

Cornelia Lund is a media and design theorist, curator, and the co-editor of Design der Zukunft (Designing the Future). She is questioning the role of design at a moment when design has become ubiquitous and is hailed as a solution to nearly all problems – from the design of politics to climate design. What happens if the question »What else?« is shifted from the vegetable counter to the design of human beings? What approach shall we take to the possibility of technologically and biologically enhancing human beings by design?


DESIGN STRATEGIES

Design for all: Attractive solutions for people with disabilities, the elderly, and everyone else. (DE)

Mathias Knigge is concerned with age- and disability-related needs in order to invent designs that facilitate access and participation for everyone. His goal is to design attractive and comfortable products, architectures and services for as many users as possible. He follows the approach of ›design for all‹. Instead of special solutions based on deficiency for only a few. A design that is functional and alike for people with and without impairments. The range of his designs is as broad, and involves things such as telephones, apps, gardening tools, hotels, museums, theaters and town halls.


Leidmedien.de, Wheelmap.org, and BrokenLifts.org. Technical solutions and tools that make inclusion accessible for everyone. (DE/EN)

Raúl Krauthausen is, among other things, activist, author, and co-founder of Sozialhelden, a social enterprise consisting of a group of extraordinary change-makers known for their sustainable and innovative projects, like ›Pfandtastisch helfen!‹ or ›Deutschland sucht den SuperZivi‹. Currently, Raúl is focusing on the development of Wheelmap.org, and on the expansion of ›Leidmedien.de‹ – an online platform and workshop series for journalists, which aims at a non-discriminatory portrayal of people with disabilities in the media.


incluWHAT – design that changes thinking. (DE)

Anastasia Umrik is a blogger and project creator from Hamburg. Others call her an expert on inclusion. She says she just likes art and creativity, and that inclusion or exclusion is not a question of disability. Her design and fashion label incluWHAT – design, that changes thinking (inkluWAS – design, das denken verändert) is dedicated to the topics of diversity and acceptance. Anastasia wants to improve the thinking about inclusion by creating designs that show that we may not be all alike, but all of equal value.


___DESIRE

Come closer. What is affinity? (DE)

Born in the Rhineland, Edith Arnold now lives and works in Hamburg as a freelance sexual caretaker for people with disabilities. Why do we need affection and what happens when we get touched? Sexual caretakers provide closeness where people or social environments are not able to otherwise assist. She is convinced that the question whether sexual caretaking is prostitution or not is moot. Her critique is a more practical one: Does this kind of outsourcing sexuality relieve facilities for disabled people of their responsibility for their residents’ sexuality? Should the facilities provide patients with a private space for it?


Long live the new flesh! The passion for destroyed bodies in David Cronenberg’s Crash and Videodrome. (DE)

Oliver Schmidt works as a film and media scholar at the University of Hamburg. He is concerned with the relation between media and culture and how media reflect societal changes, fears and utopias. Cinema works as an aesthetic laboratory that confronts its audience with collectively suppressed topics and images.


___EDUCATION

The critique of autistic reason. On Diogenes, Till Eulenspiegel, Isaac Newton, and Albert Einstein (DE)

The writer Axel Brauns is a person with autism. In his talk, he introduces us into the appealingly strange world of autism, which shapes our culture more than we know.


Books shape the consciousness – disability in contemporary schoolbooks. (DE)

For eleven years now, Lars Bruhn works as a research assistant at the Centre for Disability Studies, Hamburg (ZeDiS). Inclusion has been a challenge for regular schools since 2009, when the UN convention treaty on Rights of Persons with Disabilities were applied in Germany. As textbooks function as a mirror of society, what do they teach about disability and do they address students with disabilities as well? How do they approach current aspects of medical progress that aims to prevent disabled life?


The meaning(s) of (human) value in arts-based education. (EN)

Katherine Runswick-Cole is a professor of Critical Disability Studies & Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University and the mother of a young man with an intellectual disability. Through her work and her personal connection to this thing we call ›disability‹, she thinks that people with intellectual disabilities are not considered to be ›fully human‹ in our current social and political times. Katherine is concerned with what it means to be human, and how disability can disrupt, expand and enlarge the category of ›human‹.


___EMBODIMENT

Why humans’ innermost images are not produced inside their heads. (DE/EN)

Klaus Mecherlein is convinced that the human power of creating images does not originate in the brain – but rather in the gut, the legs, the fingers, the (proverbial) heart, or from inside the somatic cells. The insight that the concept of an artwork is already immanent to the human body, rather than being an intellectual construct, informs Mecherlein’s work as a freelance artist, art historian, curator, author, lecturer, and founder of ›atelier hpca for outsider artists‹ in Munich.


Embody data: self-measurement, normality, and a society of prevention. (DE/EN)

Lisa Wiedemann is a sociologist working at HafenCity University, Hamburg. She doesn’t know a lot about the duration of her own REM sleep phase, her daily-absolved paces, or her average emotional constitution. Yet, in her Ph.D. thesis, she investigates these vital signs as references to the body and the self. They appear increasingly popular since the invasion of smart technologies into everyday life, under the label of ›quantified self‹. How does the relation to one’s own body transform if it becomes a data project that constantly provides numeric feedback?


___ETHICS

Psycho-surgical procedures and deep brain stimulations. Clinical, juridical, and ethical consequences of neurobiological discoveries and their application in the field of human sexuality. (DE)

Johannes Fuß is a psychiatrist and researcher at the Institute for Sexual Research, Hamburg. He is interested in neurobiological behavioral mechanisms, such as criminal or sexual behavior, and the ethical-legal and medical consequences these biological explanatory models have. His research includes topics such as deep-brain stimulation, punishment of mentally ill offenders, and psychosurgical procedures for sexual offenders in Hamburg during the 1970s.


Be aware of experts! On risks and side effects of ethics. (DE)

Petra Gehring is a professor for philosophy at the TU Darmstadt. She is an expert on theories about life and death, bio- and death-ethics as well as on questions of legal philosophy. She also works on the problematic set of issues concerning ›reality‹, and on concepts of power, with special regard to digital technologies and the history of waking, sleeping, and dreaming. She critically looks at a culture of ethical experts and discusses its political dimensions.


The ethics of quantum physics – Karen Barad’s realism and the entanglement of devices and nature. (DE/EN)

Wolfgang Hagen is a professor for media studies at Leuphana University, Lüneburg. During his long career as radio editor, TV host, lecturer, and researcher he has questioned how technologies and media surrounding us determine what we think, say, and do. What interests him in the writings of Karen Barad, is the relationship between nature and the apparatuses that we perceive nature through – and how this relationship could be described as ›ethical‹. How would future ethics that take into account our state of the art technological and scientific concepts would look like?


Plea for a fragile body (DE)

Marianne Hirschberg is a professor for disability studies and a human rights activist from Bremen. Since her teenage years she has been fascinated with the slogan »rather crazy and alive than normal and dead!«. Her interest in ›being equal‹ and ›being different‹ as genuine characteristics of all people led her to questioning social practices repeatedly. How do discourses construct what is human (and thereby, what is non-disabled) these days, within a neoliberal logic of exploitation?


The construction of the individual in moral philosophy – or why Peter Singer cannot think inclusion. (DE)

Swantje Köbsell is a professor for disability studies at the Alice Salomon University of Applied Sciences, Berlin. She has actively taken part in the emancipatory disability rights movement and advocates its interests as a member of the scientific advisory board for the participation report of the Federal Government. In her academic research, she is particularly interested in bio-ethical questions and their existential meaning for people with disabilities.


How much autonomy and how much selection are in prenatal diagnostics? (DE)

Silke Koppermann is a gynecologist from Hamburg. She is the speaker of the Network against Selection by Prenatal Diagnostics. Through her work she knows how new technologies influence existential decisions and ideas about health, life, and family. She advocates a critical approach to the common use of prenatal screening methods and urges comprehensive education on prescribed medical tests and examinations.


___FILM

Face/Response. A film about a person that does not answer. (DE)

Peter Ott is a filmmaker, script writer, producer, and professor for film and video at the Merz Academy, Stuttgart. The protagonist of his movie Face and Response, Daniela Ott, seems to be reduced to bare life by her speechlessness and immobility. How can a woman with such severe disabilities become a protagonist, and, therefore, an acting individual? On the basis of one scene from the movie and his own experiences, Peter Ott talks about dependent lives, about looking back, and about the precarious human condition.


When leftist revolutionaries play disabled. Lars von Trier releases the ›inner idiot‹. (DE)

Oliver Schmidt works as a film and media scholar at the University of Hamburg. He is concerned with the relation between media and culture and how media reflects societal changes, fears and utopias. Cinema works as an aesthetic laboratory that confronts its audience with collectively suppressed topics and images.


___FREAKS


Dwarfism. (Media) Freak shows past and present. (DE)


Michel Arriens is a blogger, photographer, and filmmaker. He is interested in forms of discrimination and representation of people with disabilities. Being of small stature himself, he gives lectures and tutorials on good language and imagery. »Midget-tossing«, »tied to a wheelchair«, and »Game of Thrones« are among his discussed buzzwords. How are people of small stature portrayed nowadays, and how do they want to be?


Framing the Black Freakazoid (EN)

Vaginal Davis is the internationally revered intersexed doyenne of intermedia arts and sciences. She takes public discourse to Dementia 13 levels as she spells out the queer and blatino experience in her own inimitable fashion creating new words out of thin air and crashing bull-in-a-Madame Mau China-Shop style over notions of propriety and reality.


Shock and curiosity, respect and responsibility. Challenges for the observer by photographs of disabled bodies, freak shows, and prostheses models. (DE)

Wolfgang Knapp is an author, curator, artist, and lecturer at the University of the Arts, Berlin. He is interested in the emergence and migration of photographs depicting disabled bodies through different spaces and institutions. The photographs originate from private environments or artistic contexts, within the scope of assistance, nursing, or advertising. How are these pictures produced and what do they do to us?


From freak shows to freak culture. The return of the extraordinary and the neo-liberal regime of the exceptional. (DE)

Birgit Stammberger worked as a goldsmith before studying Applied Cultural Studies at the University of Lüneburg, as between the two vocations she visited a ›freak museum‹ in Coney Island, New York. Fascinated by the modern discourse of escalation, she started a research project on ›freaks‹, and in 2011 published her results in the book Monsters and Freaks. She currently works as an academic coordinator at the Centre for Cultural Research, Lübeck.


___FUTURE

Does humankind become sicker or sickness more human? On the question of a potential increase and understanding of mental illnesses. (DE)

Thomas Bock is a professor for clinical psychology and social psychiatry and head of the socio-psychiatric outpatient clinic at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf. For 40 years, he has been concerned with the disputable, flowing transition definitions of healthy and sick. He established a trialogue between the affected, their relatives, and professionals in numerous publications as well as in psychosis workshops. Thomas Bock is searching for an alternative to the clinical pathology methods of contemporary psychiatry. He favors an ›anthropological comprehension‹ that does not only focus on deviance, but also concentrates on what is common and deeply human – especially in mental states of emergency.


Citizen science and DIY-Labs: Notions of life in the 21st century (or why life is something that becomes less and less concerned with humans). (DE)

Laura Hille is a social scientist who is interested in the intersection of social theory, media culture, and the philosophy of technology. A reformulation of what we call ›life‹ is underway ever since cybernetics got under our skin with microchip implants invading our bodies, particularly with contemporary practices like biohacking – experiments of organic material and biometrical sensors – contest our concept of life itself.

___HALLUCINATION

Voting rights for the soul? On the frequency and understanding of voice hearing and acoustic hallucinations (DE)

Thomas Bock is a professor for clinical psychology and social psychiatry and head of the socio-psychiatric outpatient clinic at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf. For 40 years, he has been concerned with the disputable, flowing transition definitions of healthy and sick. He established a trialogue between the affected, their relatives, and professionals in numerous publications as well as in psychosis workshops. Thomas Bock is searching for an alternative to the clinical pathology methods of contemporary psychiatry. He favors an ›anthropological comprehension‹ that does not only focus on deviance, but also concentrates on what is common and deeply human – especially in mental states of emergency.


Media of the future. Phantasms beyond death, memory and simulation (DE)

Thomas Weber is professor at the Institute for Media and Communication at the University of Hamburg. He is concerned with media phantasms. His research revolves around depictions of memories and the past, as well as visions of future media imagined by popular media – in movies such as Matrix or Strange Days. His analysis focusses on defects, disruptions, and absences that emphasize the construction of these phantasms.


___HEROES AND HEROINES

Bruised heroes – war, prosthetics, and disturbed masculinity. (DE)

Sabine Kienitz is a historically curious scholar and a professor of cultural studies at the University of Hamburg. She investigates how war, bodies, and memory correlate: How are experiences of war embedded in bodies, how does society respond to those injured bodies, and which part do mechanizations of damaged bodies play therein. Can technology really fix everything?


The blind super woman and the echo of light – where fiction meets reality. (DE/EN)

Andreas Pflüger is a novelist and writer for film and theatre. He wrote scripts for over thirty films, including the famous German television series Tatort. His specialties are crime stories and thrillers. The female protagonist of his new novel, Endgültig (Ultimately), is a federal criminal police officer who specializes in interrogation tactics and case analysis. She is highly intelligent, battle-scarred, deadly, and blind. Her stupendous, nearly superhuman abilities to hear, feel, and orient herself are based on the distinct, and accurate perceptions of blind people.


The science of being a hero: cybernetic bodies, magical limbs and saving the video game world. (EN/PL)

Aleksandra Spisak got a bachelor’s degree in culture, science and new media in 2014 to better understand the ever-changing world of pop culture. Since then, she has participated in developing two successful puzzle video games for the 9 Clues series and has assisted with writing and illustrating a book about game design for beginners in Poland. In addition to this, she plays games, reads about even more games and makes art... for games.


___HISTORY

German culture of remembrance. Indictment: scribblings of someone incapacitated. Crime scene: Alsterdorfer institutions and lunatic asylum Langenhorn. Time: Nazi period until today. Defendant: the director of the institutions, charged with mass murder. (DE)

Dietrich Kuhlbrodt sees himself as a practitioner, not a scholar. How do I perceive what is happening, and how do I cope with it? Being a child of the mainstream culture of the 1930s, Kuhlbrodt enjoyed sheltered normality ranging from the Hindenburg on the radio to child soldier camps of the Hitler Youth. Later, he pursued Nazi crimes as a state prosecutor. Today, coping with the past, he experiences a virulent intermediate zone emerging towards an unresolved present. From Nazi’s ›unworthy to live‹ to prenatal diagnostics – what can he as a grandfather say about it?


An illustrated world history by Rohullah Kazimi (DE)

Rohullah Kazimi is an artist and time traveler. Being part of the studio community ›Die Schlumper‹, he paints, writes, and embroiders his life’s work. For the past several years he is occupied with capturing an overview on world history, from A to Z, via drawings and writings.


___HUMAN

HUMAN/MACHINE

Mech-Art-Tronics – Machine enhancements and robot performances. (DE)

As a member of the artist groups ›F18‹ and ›Observers of machine operators‹, as well as in solo projects, Lars Vaupel is interested in the entanglement of mechanics, electronics, and programming for mainly artistic applications in his installations and objects, or commissioned work for other artists. He will present the works concerned with unusual combinations of bodies and machines.

HUMAN/ANIMAL

Functioning guide dog teams. (DE)

Xantos is a trained guide dog. Torsten Wolfsdorff is a teacher for Braille and advises guide dog owners and people who are looking for guide dogs. Xantos’ elegant sidestepping works even in crowded concert halls, where he is only allowed to enter because of Torsten Wolfsdorff’s activist stubbornness. Or maybe it is more pragmatic, he is committed to letting dog and human stay in each other’s company, wherever they wish to be together.


___HUMANISM

PARAHUMANISM

Post/Trans/Para. A tendentious introduction in x-humanisms. (DE)

Karin Harrasser is a professor for Cultural Studies at the University of Art and Design, Linz. She thinks that although we are already living in close cooperation with machines of all sorts, we still have only a limited repertoire of images, stories, and concepts to conceive of our living, and dying, together with them. Classical questions Karin is interested in concern definitions of the good life, the right to imperfection, and the distribution of resources. Her post-classical interests lie in models of cooperation with machines, a pataphysical science, and the parahuman.

POSTHUMANISM

Cyborgs and fitness-trackers. From 1980s post-humanism to today’s digital (anti-)humanism. (DE)

Martina Leeker is a theatre and media scholar. She currently works as a senior researcher at the Digital Cultures Research Lab (DCRL) at Leuphana University, Lüneburg. She has been carrying out research on art, science, and technology since the 1990s. Starting in the 1960, art developed a fascination with technical resonances, loss of control, self-illusion, and an embodiment of technology. This fascination could help us to understand why we dismissed ›the human‹ during the 1980s/90s – and why we bring it out again today, mainly as a provider of data and operator of infrastructures and algorithms.


TRANSHUMANISM

Can technology morally credibly perfect human beings? Is transhumanism »the world’s most dangerous idea«? (DE/EN)

Stefan Lorenz Sorgner is a philosopher. He describes himself as a »Nietzschean transhumanist«. He is convinced that humankind is not the sole summit of creation. Being a philosophy professor at John Cabot University, Rome, he traces the theoretical and the mundane implications of this reevaluation of humankind. He focuses on moral issues and possibilities of human self-design, which come with new technologies.


___HUMAN RIGHTS

The unenhanced: What has happened to those deemed ›unfit‹. (EN)

Kenny Fries for two decades has written about how physical disability provides an understanding of the interconnectedness between individuals and also between different cultures. He has used the prism of his life as a writer who lives with a congenital disability to forge a new understanding of a wide range of values and ideas, from systems of interdependence to Darwinian evolution. He is currently investigating the experiences of disability in Germany.


Psychiatry clinics, hospitals, lunatic colonies, prisons, facilities for the elderly, and other separation and deportation institutions: What it means to be an inmate. (DE)

Marianne Hirschberg is a professor for disability studies and a human rights activist from Bremen. Since her teenage years she has been fascinated with the slogan »rather crazy and alive than normal and dead!«. Her interest in ›being equal‹ and ›being different‹ as genuine characteristics of all people led her to questioning social practices repeatedly. How do discourses construct what is human (and thereby, what is non-disabled) these days, within a neoliberal logic of exploitation?


What does the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities actually change? Stories of success and frustration concerning labor laws of people with disabilities. (DE)

Babette Tondorf is a lawyer working at the law office ›People and Rights‹ in Hamburg. Her focus of activity is criminal and labor law, frequently with regard to medical evaluation. For example, she defended a client who is living in a residential home and can’t stop stealing his neighbor’s Coke. Or to defend in a case of a public employer that does not actually fire an employee with disabilities, but puts him virtually out of work over long periods of time - a violation of human rights that disguises itself as a dreadful individual case.


___INABILITY

Inability. Some speculations on technology, openness towards the future, and love. (DE)

An expert talk between:
Karin Harrasser is a professor for Cultural Studies at the University of Art and Design, Linz. She thinks that although we are already living in close cooperation with machines of all sorts, we still have only a limited repertoire of images, stories, and concepts to conceive of our living, and dying, together with them. Classical questions Karin is interested in concern definitions of the good life, the right to imperfection, and the distribution of resources. Her post-classical interests lie in models of cooperation with machines, a pataphysical science, and the parahuman.

Klaus Birnstiel is a literary scholar at the University of Basel. He lives with a 250-pound wheelchair that takes over many basic functions of his body. His work deals with cultural representations of disability and sexuality, but also with the question of the relation between body and technology. His research shows that disabled bodies have always been fascinating. Birnstiel is not only interested in the curiosity and cultural perception of non-disabled people, but also how disabled bodies can look back when they feel exposed to the gaze of others.


Of origins. In the beginning was the flaw. (DE)

Reinhard Kahl is an education researcher, journalist, and filmmaker. His work focusses on the pleasure of thinking and learning, the imposition of being lectured, and the endless dramas of growing up. He is especially interested in anything that does not fit together. He learned his way of thinking in anti-authoritarian socialist youth groups, intensified it during prolonged studies, cultivated it as a journalist, author, moderator, and host of the philosophic café at Hamburg’s house of literature, to finally build his ›archive of the future‹.

___INCLUSION

Art and inclusion in Serbia, or How to become who you are? (EN/SR/HR/BS)

Saša Asentić was born in Bosnia and has worked in Serbia as a performance maker and cultural worker. Asentic is interested in exploring the relationship between the individual and society and analyzing it in terms of social choreography. In 1999, he founded ›Per.Art‹, a disability arts program. he moved to Germany in 2011 after being a victim of right wing street violence and fundamentally disagreeing with the corruption in public sector of Serbia.


Fuck inclusion! A critique of an engrossed concept. (DE)

Jürgen Homann, staff member of the Hamburg Centre for Disability Studies, starts a sweeping blow on the public and scientific discourse of inclusion and wonders about its consequences for disability studies. The notion of inclusion became popular due to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The underlying understanding of disability features a reactionary rollback, which severely undermines its social potential and thereby verifies that everything stays the way it is.


Stories under German rugs: On exclusion of so-called asocial people and empowerment from the perspective of someone disintegrated. (DE)

In March 2015, Tucké Royale founded the nomadic Central Council of Asocial People in Germany (ZAiD) and functions as its First Spokesperson. Seventy years after VE Day, ZAiD advocates for a visible rehabilitation of people who were imprisoned in workhouses and concentration camps with the Black Triangle. The First Spokesperson offers insight into a heterogenic history of persecution as well as strategies of disintegration. It is ZAiD!


___INSANITY

A place beyond. Scenic lecture with map and compass on the ›lunatic colony‹ Langenhorn upon Hamburg. (DE)

Monika Ankele is a historian who carries out research on the history of psychiatry in the 19th and 20th century. She is especially interested in material culture like creative works of patients, or medical objects such as hospital beds. Equipped with a map and a compass, Monika Ankele will go back to the founding period of the agricultural ›lunatic colony‹ Langenhorn upon Hamburg. It was an insular place away from the city, built for the commitment of mentally sick men and women that were denied any prospect of healing.


___LANGUAGE

Is sign language not universal? Professor Hair Quiff illuminates on misunderstandings and subtleties of sign language. (GSL with DE or EN interpretation)

Christian Rathmann is a German linguist at the Department for Language, Literature and Media Science at the University of Hamburg. He is also the first deaf professor in Germany. He is constantly astonished how little people know about sign language, for instance, how it has nothing to do with spoken German, or that sign language does not translate, but rather interprets or draws a picture.


Is ›Plain Language‹ really easy? (DE)

The Leipzig-based professor Saskia Schuppener conducts, together with people with learning difficulties, research on ›Plain Language‹, a specifically modified linguistic mode of expression that aims at a particularly easy comprehensibility and thereby accessibility. She discusses, if and for whom this so-called plain language is actually easy, and asks about the important elements of understanding, experiencing, and enjoying texts.


___MIGRATION

Exodus and disability. (DE)

Ahmaid comes from Afghanistan and has a brother in a wheelchair. He talks about social and medical situations of people with disabilities in Afghanistan, the journey to Germany, and the circumstances in a subsequent shelter for refugees in Hamburg.

Waldemar Diener works for the project ›Refuge Counseling‹ (›ZuFlucht Lebenshilfe‹). He is concerned with the topics of exodus and disability from an intercultural angle. There are people with all kinds of disabilities among the refugees coming to Germany that are far away from public awareness›Refuge Counseling‹ puts their complex situations into social focus.


Between all systems: The particular invisibility of migrants with disabilities. (DE)

Swantje Köbsell is a professor for disability studies at the Alice Salomon University of Applied Sciences, Berlin. She has actively taken part in the emancipatory disability rights movement and advocates its interests as a member of the scientific advisory board for the participation report of the Federal Government. In her academic research, she is particularly interested in bio-ethical questions and their existential meaning for people with disabilities.


___NORMALITY

Of sea snails and other variations. The creativity of deviation. (DE/EN)

Hildegard Fuhrberg is a healer. She draws from a long apprenticeship with different shamans from all around the world, and then adjusted her methods to a Western cultural sphere. Shamanism is not some kind of archaic psychotherapy, in fact, shamans would be surprised by this definition, as the construct of ›psyche‹ in opposition to the body is unfamiliar to them. The human being is an indissoluble unity of both, hence a definition like ›psychosomatics‹ would seem rather odd in the eyes of a shaman.


German ›Leitkultur‹: The normality of so-called euthanasia. (DE)

Dietrich Kuhlbrodt sees himself as a practitioner, not a scholar. How do I perceive what is happening, and how do I cope with it? Being a child of the mainstream culture of the 1930s, Kuhlbrodt enjoyed sheltered normality ranging from the Hindenburg on the radio to child soldier camps of the Hitler Youth. Later, he pursued Nazi crimes as a state prosecutor. Today, coping with the past, he experiences a virulent intermediate zone emerging towards an unresolved present. From Nazi’s ›unworthy to live‹ to prenatal diagnostics – what can he as a grandfather say about it?


Body taxonomies and the imperialism of normality. (DE)

Katharina Liebsch, as a professor for sociology, is concerned with normalizations of bodies that come with new medical diagnoses and concomitantly deployed innovative medical techniques. Diagnoses and therapies acknowledge that affected people are suffering from a disease. At the same time, new classifications and standards of distinguishing ›healthy‹ and ›sick‹ are established. In this new normality, divergences have less and less space.


___OPTIMIZATION

The perfect human being? Enhancement technologies and their social implications. (DE)

Regula Valérie Burri is a professor for science and technology cultures at HafenCity University, Hamburg. Her research focusses on social, cultural, and political implications of science and technology. She concentrates on knowledge, science, tech cultures, visual knowledge, and the intersections of science and art. She looks into the governance of science and technology, particularly in the fields of bio-medical science, bio-sciences, and how enhancement technologies pose crucial questions about present society and human self-conception.


Human optimization for world improvement. Laboratory for a radical dis-anthropologization. (DE)

Norma C. is an officially recognized distributor of knowledge and starry-eyed idealist. Since the beginning of the 21st century, she has been working on epistemological devices that help to improve the world. One problematic factor is ›the human‹, its invention did not only drive us onto the couches of greedy psychologists, but led us to a deceitful system of human categories, and the destruction of the earth. Norma C. works with theories and research results from cultural, media, and human sciences as well as with new technologies. She was awarded for her work by former Federal President Christian Wulff in 2012.


Disability activism in times of self-optimization. (DE)

As one of the founders of the German ›cripple movement‹, Udo Sierck has been asking, for over thirty years, why many people think of disabled people as kind, grateful, and a little stupid. As a lecturer and publicist, he is convinced that nothing is as boring as normality and perfection, and that a few more children, women, and men with disabilities can only do us good.

Do androids dream of implanted ape testicles? Homo sapiens 3.0 or the revenge of the self-optimizers. (DE)

Birgit Stammberger worked as a goldsmith before studying Applied Cultural Studies at the University of Lüneburg, as between the two vocations she visited a ›freak museum‹ in Coney Island, New York. Fascinated by the modern discourse of escalation, she started a research project on ›freaks‹, and in 2011 published her results in the book Monsters and Freaks. She currently works as an academic coordinator at the Centre for Cultural Research, Lübeck.

Brief interviews with quantified men. A small ethnography of self-measurement (DE/EN)

Lisa Wiedemann is a sociologist working at HafenCity University, Hamburg. She doesn’t know a lot about the duration of her own REM sleep phase, her daily-absolved paces, or her average emotional constitution. Yet, in her Ph.D. thesis, she investigates these vital signs as references to the body and the self. They appear increasingly popular since the invasion of smart technologies into everyday life, under the label of ›quantified self‹. How does the relation to one’s own body transform if it becomes a data project that constantly provides numeric feedback?

___PROSTHETICS

Pimp my replacement leg! Colorful custom-made prostheses. (DE)

Frank Purk is from Hamburg, where he creates artificial legs. They are colorful or elegant, amusing or sexy, and sometimes even tattooed. Purk has been an orthopedic technician for 17 years, and works at the Motion Center Holger Otto since 2014. He founded Frank Purk Prosthetic Design in 2010. To him, ›Prosthetic design‹ means perceptive enhancement by personalizing aids in order to change people’s own perception (and that of others).


C-legs and Lego legs. Autonomy, enhancement, and humor in dealing with a leg prosthesis. (DE)

Sabine Kienitz is a historically curious scholar and a professor of cultural studies at the University of Hamburg. She investigates how war, bodies, and memory correlate: How are experiences of war embedded in bodies, how does society respond to those injured bodies, and which part do mechanizations of damaged bodies play therein. Can technology really fix everything?

Take your prostheses to your grave: The research project ›LifeLongJoints‹ (with showpieces). (DE/EN)

Michael Morlock is head of the Hamburg Institute of Biomechanics, a professor at the Technical University, Hamburg, and former president of the German Society for Biomechanics. As a mathematician and sports scientist, he tries to develop endoprostheses that last a lifetime – and even beyond. He will discuss societal challenges of medical technologies by showing prostheses that outlived their owners (such as artificial heart valves and hip joints).


___REPAIR

Brain plasticity through micro-stream impulses: Reconstructing vision after blindness. (DE/EN)

Bernhard Sabel is a professor of Medical Psychology at the University of Magdeburg. He holds a Ph.D. in psychobiology and neuroscience. He has held research positions at MIT, Harvard, Princeton, University of Munich, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He’s researching vision restoration, brain plasticity, recovery from retina and brain damage, and nanobiotechnology. He combines a psychological perspective with physiological and biological research, bringing up questions such as: how does a patient cope with vision loss and the uncanny experience of suddenly being able to see again?


Nothing to fix: On Cochlea implants, audism and a use_ful body. (DE)

Joke Janssen lives and works in Hamburg on the intersections of trans*/queer art|politics|theory, where s/he regularly fails with great enjoyment, and preferably in small collectives. Joke’s works circle the body under normative conditions: Which bodies are touchable, which are not right, and which are avoidable? How can we perceive possibilities for future bodies? Joke studied German sign language, sociology, gender and queer studies, and pursues a Ph.D. on trans*materialization beyond the visible at the University of Fine Arts, Hamburg.


___SENSIBILITY

Neurodiversity. A philosophical journey into other ecologies of perception (DE/EN)

Christoph Brunner is a junior professor for cultural theory at the Leuphana University, Lüneburg. He is interested in forms of collectivity in artistic, philosophical, and activist contexts. As a member of SenseLab Montreal, he cooperates with researchers and activists in the field of neurodiversity. He is interested in exploring different environments that bring about new forms of collectivity. What can we learn of human beings that are not perceiving their environment as centered around other individuals, but instead around objects and their relation within a space?


Music for bionic ears. (DE/EN/ES/CAT)

Waldo Nogueira is a junior professor at the Auditory Prosthetic Group of the German Hearing Center at the Medical University, Hannover. He performs research to understand and improve the sound produced by bionic ears, or cochlear implants. In his project ›MusIC 2.0‹ he cooperated with sound artists and musicians to develop a concert for people with cochlear implants. What sounds good for bionic ears? Stockhausen or Beethoven? Violin or piano? Or maybe the sounds produced when puffing the bellows of an accordion?


»Then I always become very sad«: Trauma therapy for people with mental disabilities – a case study. (DE)

Bettina Saathoff offers psychotherapy for people with mental disabilities for over 25 years. It has not been for long since people with mental disabilities were conceded to have psychological issues, and therefore being able to benefit from psychotherapy. Her treatments require being vivid and descriptive. Since there is still no specialized training in treating mentally challenged people, it is necessary to ›translate‹ established procedures and interventions to something practical for their specific needs.


An emotional map: excursions to weightlessness in painting. (DE)

Laura Schwörer is an artist from Kiel. She is not so much interested in what she can see, but what she realizes when she looks inside herself, or into other people and objects. In her colorful paintings, she creates worlds of fractal fairies who draw themselves into infinity, or advocate the inclusion of aliens. Laura is seeking a universal language she »is cutting out of the fabric of her sprouting feelings«.


___SEX

Basketball players, bicyclists, and wheel chair drivers: Gay sex and disability in Michael D. Akers’s Morgan. (DE/EN)

Petra Anders gives talks and writes texts on various aspects of disability and gender in film, often mixing disability studies with film studies. She comprehends diversity as a constant and mutual process of learning, one that is full of challenges, and one in which differences between people are not only accepted, but recognized. She works as an assistant professor for the research project ›AKTIF‹ at the TU Dortmund.


Critical bodies. Some uncensored comments on sex and disability. (DE/EN)

Klaus Birnstiel is a literary scholar at the University of Basel. He lives with a 250-pound wheelchair that takes over many basic functions of his body. His work deals with cultural representations of disability and sexuality, but also with the question of the relation between body and technology. His research shows that disabled bodies have always been fascinating. Birnstiel is not only interested in the curiosity and cultural perception of non-disabled people, but also how disabled bodies can look back when they feel exposed to the gaze of others.

Sexuality and disability. (DE)

Lothar Sandfort is a qualified psychologist, disability activist, and founder of the Institute of Self-Determination for People with Disabilities in Trebel. Since 2000, he has been training sexual attendants that very practically help those seeking advice for sexual activity. He sees his work as some kind of experiential education (like sailing on the Lake IJssel), which aims at taking the people concerned and their sexuality seriously. Every year he offers ten erotic seminars, and lately he also works with disabled men that started being molesting.

Sarah Lena Wabbel studied Islamic studies, works with the disabled at Hamburg’s ›Das Rauhe Haus‹, engages herself at Trebel’s Institute of Self-Determination for People with Disabilities, and started training as sexual counselor in March. She has always been fascinated with different realities, and understands her work as being part of a greater discussion about people’s access to basic human rights, and the freedom to shape one’s own life.


__SHAKESPEARE

How Iago and other globally operating intriguers deprive people of their autonomy. (FR/DE/MNK)

Ibrahima Sanogo is an actor from Hamburg. He is wondering if someday he will be playing something other than ›the African‹ or ›the refugee‹ in Europe. He is quite familiar with Iago. Iago steals his opponents’ autonomy by the means of intrigue. An intrigue or scheme looks for a victim, encircles it, and deprives it almost casually of its rights and autonomy, until impuissance and despair lead to its extinction. Ibrahima assumes that Othello is Shakespeare’s most-performed play, because it depicts the black guy as a victim. A theatrical scheme that influences real life.


Romeo and Juliet (DE)

Since 2005, Michael Schumacher has been a performer and storyteller for Meine Damen und Herren (Ladies and Gentlemen) and the artist network ›barner 16‹, which is engaged in inclusive cultural productions. His choreographic work focusses on his concept of spatial perception and thereout resulting humor. His excellent reciting skills combine with striking repartee. The duet with Antje Pfundtner shows two performers who are capable of improvising for hours.

In addition to her internationally exhibited solo dance performances, the Hamburg based choreographer and winner of the 2016 George Tabori Prize Antje Pfundtner takes part in numerous group and cooperative projects. Starting from her own biography, she is interested in overcoming long established images of the ideal dancer’s body. Her choreographies stage specific movement qualities of individual bodies with and without disabilities.

___SHAMANISM

In the folding of reality. Psychosis and psychotherapy from a shamanist point of view. (DE/EN)

Hildegard Fuhrberg is a healer. She draws from a long apprenticeship with different shamans from all around the world, and then adjusted her methods to a Western cultural sphere. Shamanism is not some kind of archaic psychotherapy, in fact, shamans would be surprised by this definition, as the construct of ›psyche‹ in opposition to the body is unfamiliar to them. The human being is an indissoluble unity of both, hence a definition like ›psychosomatics‹ would seem rather odd in the eyes of a shaman.

___SPECTACLE

Freewheeling! How to dive, ballet, and fly in a wheelchair. (EN)

Sue Austin is an internationally acclaimed multimedia, performance, and installation artist. In repurposing her wheelchair to create art, Sue reshapes how we think about disability. Sue Austin keeps a fascinating mission at the center of her work: to challenge the idea of disabled as the ›other‹ and represent her experience as a wheelchair user in a brighter light. She does this by creating quirky, unexpected juxtapositions – bringing a sense of empowerment to the discussion of disability and difference.


Epitheses and moulages in-between lecture hall, carnival and museum: (re)presentations of an (un)damaged body. (DE)

Henrik Eßler is a social & economic historian and curator at the Medical-Historic Museum, Hamburg. The focal point of his research interest is medical science and the material culture of medicine, particularly with regard to plastic images of the human body. At the beginning of the 20th century, faithfully reproduced wax models and moulages constituted the high point of an artistic craft, which aimed for a deceptively real representation of damaged and mended bodies. He will show objects and pictures from the collection and talk about the history and politics of epitheses and moulages.


___SYNESTHESIA

Listening with your eyes and seeing with your ears? (DE)

Miro Miletic is responsible for the exhibitions Dialogue in the Dark and Dialogue in Silence in the heart of the Hamburg warehouse district. These exhibitions provide the visitors with the experience that you can actually hear with your eyes and see with your ears. He himself has learned that professional and humane skills are more relevant than any visual sense. Going blind very late in his life and remaining with an eyesight capacity of only two percent, Miro Miletic transforms this presumed deficit to his advantage in his work.


Perfume sampling with an autistic. How do autistic and non-autistic people smell the fragrances of the world? (DE)

The writer Axel Brauns is a person with autism. In his talk, he introduces us into the appealingly strange world of autism, which shapes our culture more than we know.

Strange figures from another world or Why ›Bathers‹ don’t pose questions. (DE)

Markus Keuler creates wooden sculptures that resemble people with Down syndrome. In doing so, he is not much interested in depicting physiognomic peculiarities, but encountering figures that stand for an unknown world – and that; by being different, can be regarded as an equal opponent. Hence, our perception is challenged by being asked if completely different perspectives are possible.


___VISUAL REGIME

Without looking at a person: blind judges. (DE)

Uwe Boysen is a retired judge. He is also blind. He studied law and social sciences in Marburg and Bremen. He worked as a judge, mainly in civil and family cases for 30 years, beginning in 1980. From 2004 to 2016, he was chairman of the German Society for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Studies and Career. Looking at the history of this society, it becomes clear why there have been blind judges in Germany, but not in Austria – and what role Uwe Boysen has in this change. Also, you can learn how it is possible to judge whether you are lied to, even without seeing if a person is blushing.


Genuine Mongolians and a face-off with the Other (DE/ES)

Ina Vera is a member of the Berlin-based performance collective Monster Truck. Their work is concerned with aesthetics of and forms of staging the ›other‹ in combination with questioning the familiar. Body images that do not meet common standards reveal prevalent manners of perception. The collaboration with actors with Down syndrome poses questions concerning autonomy and self-empowerment, as well as exotic connotations and assumptions by the performance audience.


___WORK

Work environment and disability in the GDR. (DE)

Bertold Scharf is a research assistant in the DFG-founded research project »People with disabilities in Germany after 1945« at the Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel. He analyzes how work functions as a central factor in the living environment of people with disabilities, focusing on the work environments of handicapped people living in the GDR from 1945 to the 1980s. He is co-editor of Queered circumstances. Intersectional, economy-critical and strategic interventions (Verqueerte Verhältnisse. Intersektionale, ökonomiekritische und strategische Interventionen).


Ableism, racism and the ›willingness to integrate‹: Exclusion and inclusion in the German job market. (DE)

Marianne Pieper is a professor of sociology and head of the Center for Women, Gender and Queer Studies at the University of Hamburg. In her research, she studies the different ways of how inclusions and exclusions organize society. For example, when ableist and racist structures are presented as questions of individual ability, personal motivation, or a lack of willingness to integrate oneself into society or the job market – and thereby hold those responsible who suffer the most from those structures.


___PRACTICAL EXERCISE

Are you experienced? A musical consultation on listening to music with your whole body (DE)

Mischa Gohlke is a guitar player and Blues enthusiast from Hamburg. Born with a hearing impairment that left him nearly entirely deaf, he became a professional musician anyway (or maybe precisely because of it). His initiative ›limits are relative‹ stands for an inclusive and sustainable society. His pilot program ›music lessons for hearing-impaired people‹ has been won numerous awards. He is currently working on a project called ›being different unites – an inclusion anthem for Germany‹. Mischa offers consultation on exact listening with the entire body and, in doing so, asks for a holistically experienced inclusion.


»And if my eyes, all quietly and vis-à-vis, soak into yours – what are they telling thee?« An introduction to sign language. (GSL)

Britta Harms is a sign language facilitator at the Institute for German Sign Language, Hamburg. Almost 40 years ago, she immersed into a visually perceived language and cultural community, and then got involved with transcultural language teaching. Her work is based on the experience that the human body has far more options to communicate than the methods most people usually deploy.


Useful knowledge on the Blackmarket. (DE)

You think the choice of talks is too wide? A crucial knowledge offer is missing? You feel overwhelmed with the murmuring discourse and collective hallucinations? Here, you’ll gain a better overview. Marian Kaiser, one of the Blackmarket curators, offers insight into the production process, structures, and limits of the Blackmarket for Useful Knowledge and Non-Knowledge.


___EKPHRASIS

The Blackmarket dialogues are negotiations between narrator and listener. Just not on this table. Here, it’s all about relations between the visible and the speakable, between image and language. For half an hour each, an expert looks at pictures of extraordinary bodies and describes them as exactly and vividly as possible for your headphones and the Blackmarket sound archive: www.blackmarket-archive.com. The experts will be announced the same evening. The audience is invited to subscribe for a 30-minute picture description as well.