WHY TALK TO ANIMALS.
A Trilogy by Mobile Academy Berlin




Drawings: : Florian Stirnemann

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>> Context

May 2015
>> PART1: CONFERENCE
>>
EXPERTS
>> ABSTRACTS

September 2015
>> PART2: THE SHOOTING
>> LINE UP IN THE ARENA
>> COUPLES IN THE ARENA
>> SCIENTISTS IN THE LABORATORY
>> FILM & RADIO
>> VIDEO DOCUMENTATION (excerpt)

December 2015 / February 2016
>> Part3: The Product

 

 

 

Lectures (á 45min.)

11:00am
Welcome by Adam Budak (National Gallery Prague), Jakob Racek (Goethe Institut Prague) and Maximilian Haas and Hannah Hurtzig

11:30am
Giovanni Aloi: Roni Horn: Taxidermy, Photography and Ontological Mobility
> Lecture Giovanni Aloi at youtube

12:30am
Marco Stella: The Meaning of the Salamander. Andrias scheuchzeri in Czech science and culture in the 20th century

2:30pm
Olesya Turkina: Portraying Ideology. About images of Soviet Space Dogs
> Lecture Olesya Turkina at youtube

3:30pm
Jana Horáková : Into the ZOO with Patricia Piccinini

5:00pm
Cord Riechelmann: Could we portray an animal without mythological or shakespearean subtexts? Remarks on three animal short film portrays from Romuald Karmakar, Ken Wardrop and Chen Sheinberg

6:00pm
Steve Baker: The contemporary animal
> Lecture Steve Baker at youtube




WHY TALK TO ANIMALS.

EXPERTS:

Giovanni Aloi
studied Fine Art – Theory and Practice and Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths University. He is a Lecturer in History of Art and Visual Cultures at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Sotheby’s Institute of Art London/New York, and Tate Galleries. He lectures on subjects of modern and contemporary art with an emphasis on the representation of nature and animals. He is Editor in Chief of Antennae, the Journal of Nature in Visual Culture (www.antennae.org.uk). Aloi completed his PhD on ‘taxidermy in contemporary art’ at Goldsmiths University of London in 2014. In 2011 he published Art & Animals with IB Tauris.

Steve Baker
writes about contemporary artists’ engagement with questions of animal life. He is Emeritus Professor of Art History at the University of Central Lancashire, and his books include Artist|Animal (2013), Killing Animals (with The Animal Studies Group, 2006), The Postmodern Animal (2000) and Picturing the Beast (1993). His artwork was included in the recent exhibitions Ecce Animalia (Museum of Contemporary Sculpture, Poland, 2014
) and Arche Noah (Museum Ostwall, Germany, 2014-15), and has also been shown in the UK, USA and Australia. He is on the editorial boards of animal studies journals in the USA, UK, Australia and Italy.

Jana Horáková
graduated in Theatre studies. She is an associate professor in Aesthetics and teaches Theory of interactive media studies at Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University. She is interested in artistic activities in the point of intersection between art-science-technology with special attention to media-performance and robotic art. Recently she has become interested in media archaeology, software studies, and new media research methodologies in general. Horáková is an editor of the Czech-language open-access electronic journal TIM. Prior to her academic career she studied dance and was a member of the ballet ensemble of the National Theatre Prague.

Cord Riechelmann
studied Biology and Philosophy at the Freie Universität Berlin. He was a lecturer for Social Behaviour of Primates and History of Biology and is currently lecturing at the Studium Generale, Berlin University of the Arts. He writes for numerous German newspapers and journals including Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Merkur, taz and jungle world. He is the author of Bestiarium (2003), Wilde Tiere in der Großstadt (2004) and Krähen (2013). In 2011 he curated a program on animals in film at Kurzfilmtage in Oberhausen (with Marcel Schwierin). An essay on the forest is forthcoming with Merve.

Marco Stella
Ph.D., graduated in anthropology at the Charles University (CU) in Prague. His main research interests cover history of biology and anthropology, especially the role of animals and animal representations in science. He teaches at the Faculty of Humanities and at the Faculty of Science at Charles University, where he also works as curator of the Hrdlicka Museum of Man. He is editor of the series Andrias (CU) and Nonhumans in Social Sciences. His current research deals with anthropomorphic interpretations of animal behaviour in science and popular culture around 1900.

Olesya Turkina
critic and curator, is a Senior Research Fellow at the State Russian Museum and Head of the MA Program in Curatorial Studies at the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Smolny College), St. Petersburg State University. She has worked on numerous exhibitions, including Manifesta 10 (St. Petersburg, 2014), Art Basel Miami Beach (2006) and the 48th Venice Biennale (1999), and contributed to numerous publications. Recent books include The Life of Remarkable Monroe (with Viktor Mazin, 2014), Soviet Space Dogs (Fuel London, 2014). Since 1999 she is a member of Russian Federation of Cosmonautics.